FANG! PET AND GARDEN SUPPLY
Does a Raw Diet Make Sense for Your Dog?

Does a Raw Diet Make Sense for Your Dog?

The pet food industry continues to follow the latest trends and hopes to influence pet parents to buy certain brands. There have been so many food recalls over the past few years it’s now more important than ever to stay on top of what your dogs eat!

What about raw diets for dogs? 

The staff here at Fang! Pet & Garden Supply did some research on the benefits of raw diets for dogs. This diet is still controversial and many vets aren’t yet on board but a lot of pet parents are big fans and our staff recommends raw diets to many of our customers.

Some things you should look for? Research the brand, ingredients, AAFCO statement and the guaranteed analysis. Whole Dog Journal talks more about this in their article about freeze-dried raw diets. Our staff always researches the sourcing (where are they getting the meat from) to make sure it’s biologically appropriate and that’s it’s completely balanced before choosing a brand.

Determine how your dog’s digestion is generally speaking before transitioning to a raw diet. Do you know if they have any allergies that should be avoided or proteins your dog does better on? Speak to your vet as well and always transition to a raw diet from kibble by mixing it with the regular food and increasing it over time (5-10 days). Your dog should be able to make a gradual transition without any digestive issues. Also, watch your animal’s stools to determine if they’re loose or if your pet is uncomfortable.

A raw diet typically consists of organ meats, muscle meat, whole or ground bone, raw eggs, fresh fruits and vegetables, and some dairy, such as yogurt.

Here are four benefits based on research and personal experience.

1. Shinier coats

Shiny healthy coats is a major benefit of feeding raw diets. Thanks to those omega fatty acids!

Raw diets are known to help strengthen the immune system. So nutrition plays a big part in healthier skin and coats. These omega fatty acids help keep inflammation down which keeps itchy skin from occurring.

2. Improved dental health

Feeding a raw diet to your dog prevents dental disease which is the cause of everything else (e.g. heart disease).

3. Increased energy

Some experts say their dogs have better concentration with commands and less hyperactive yet more energy.  This is a reason many breeds benefit from this diet. Mealtime is the best time of the day!

4. Smaller, firmer stools

Smaller stools are not a myth. You’ll be stunned after feeding raw at how small the stool was after a few days. And in addition to smaller stools, they are less pungent smelling and typically much firmer than stools you’ll see on a kibble based diet.

Should you add supplements?

Yes! Ask our staff about raw goats milk or Kifer, Konagen along Green Juju and bone broth.

Konagen

  • Konagen- Locally-made collagen broth that can ease the joint pain/inflammation and increase mobility in senior pets! Cats too.

Green Juju

  • Juju – Staff often match this supplement to folks reporting that their dogs love to snack on fresh green grass. A healthy way to fill the tummy at meal time or between meals for extra hungry dogs.

Goat's Milk

  • Goats milk – This is digestion support for all! Also a great way to add some calories for underweight fur friends.
Always come and talk to us about your dog’s nutritional needs so we can help you decide which raw food diet and protein makes the most sense for your dog. Nothing is more important than your dog’s health!

Disclaimer: Please consult your vet before making any drastic dietary changes to your pet’s diet. Our staff are not vets or holistic vets. 

Adding Herbs to Your Flock’s Feed to Boost Immunity and Decrease Health Issues

Adding Herbs to Your Flock’s Feed to Boost Immunity and Decrease Health Issues

We partnered with Scratch and Peck for this post as we sell their Cluckin’ Good Organic Herbs for chicken keepers. The ingredients include organic garlic, ginger, parsley, thyme, basil, oregano, nettle and my fave herb, calendula. These herbs go directly into the feed and the hens gobble them up!

Herbs

Herbs can be fed directly into the feed or free choice like you do with other types of supplements (e.g. Oyster Shell). You can also add herbs to the dust bath.

Herbs

Herbs are important for a variety of health issues

Below are the specific reasons my husband and I like to use herbs with the ladies. As a chicken keeper, a lot of the “first aid” you learn in the beginning includes wound care and respiratory issues. Some issues you can tackle proactively as herbs make a big difference when you just want to keep your flock healthy! (Avoid any wheezing and coughing).

More about each of these and how the flock will benefit.  Our staff looks to Lisa Steele, chicken expert and author of Fresh Eggs Daily, for advice and learned the following:

Herbs to Feed Chickens & their actions:

These herbs are all in Scratch and Peck’s Cluckin’ Good Organic Herbs.

  • Garlic: laying stimulant
  • Ginger: high in vitamins, parasite control
  • Parsley: laying stimulant
  • Thyme: helps with respiratory health
  • Basil: antibacterial
  • Oregano: boosts immunity, combats coccidia
  • Nettle: Increases egg production
  • Calendula: great insect repellant and makes yolks orange (who doesn’t love orange yolks!)

We also recommend growing Lavender, which repels flies and insects, and Mint, which repels rodents and bugs. You can add these as dried herbs directly in the chicken coops.

Chicken first aid kit: medicinal herbs!

Chicken First Aid

We recommend keeping some dried herbs in your chicken first aid kit. Plants were the original pharmacy for humans and animals and cultures around the world developed remedies that remain in use today. That applies to chickens too!

In addition to Cluckin’ Good Organic Herbs, many chicken keepers keep satchels of other medicinal dried herbs in their first aid kits.

These include:

  • Basil: Used for thousands of years as a culinary and medicinal herb. It acts principally on the digestive and nervous systems, easing flatulence, stomach cramps, colic and indigestion.
  • Wormwood: A very bitter plant with a long history of use as a medicinal herb. It is valued especially for its tonic effect on the liver, gallbladder and digestive system, and for its vermicidal activity. It is an extremely useful medicine for those with weak and under-active digestion. Be VERY careful that your birds don’t nibble on Wormwood but instead use this in their coop to repel mites. A small satchel attached to the top of the coop away from the roost bars so they cannot nibble on it works well. Wormwood can be toxic!
  • Ginger and Dandelion: Commonly used for digestion issues. You can add these as dried herbs directly into feed or free choice.

Chicken

Using herbs directly in the feed works best

There are so many ways to administer herbs but for chickens using them directly into the feed works best. You can also create a wash and rinse for skin injuries if someone gets pecked! This can be therapeutic for a hen. Remember to put them in your “hospital” wing until they’re all healed up! Questions or comments? Please leave them below.

Spring is around the corner! We sell starts of fresh mint and lavender in our garden center opening on March 9th for folks interested in growing your own herbs for your chicken coops.

Medical disclaimer: The staff here are not vets so please check with your vet or holistic vet when you start looking to add herbs for various health conditions. While we do believe in herbs as they have many health benefits, they are not FDA approved so please use these at your discretion.

 

Please Donate Dog Supplies to Jake n’ Max’s Boxes of Love Event in Memory of Vonnie Harris and For the Love of Senior Animals

Please Donate Dog Supplies to Jake n’ Max’s Boxes of Love Event in Memory of Vonnie Harris and For the Love of Senior Animals

For the 6th year in a row, you can donate dog supplies at Fang! Pet & Garden Supply (and our sister stores) for seniors. The store is a donation site for Jake n’ Max’s Boxes of Love and the decorated boxes are filling up!

This event is a tribute to the unwavering love of two beloved senior dogs and the drive collects donations of everything from cozy comforts for seniors, supplements for older guys, toys and any item that can brighten the lives of sweet adoptable animals at Animal Aid that need a little extra help and love. Animal Aid’s heartstring animals are featured in this campaign.

Animal Aid

Animal Aid

The campaign runs through Feb. 14 and you can donate dog supplies anytime! In year’s past, we’ve delivered nearly a carload from each store with donations of beds, food, treats, and supplies thanks to our generous customers!

This is also a very special event as we’re remembering our friend and colleague Vonnie Harris, the mastermind, behind Jake n’ Max’s Boxes. Vonnie passed away in 2018 and we miss her. A tribute was written last October.

Longtime Spot Magazine editor, Jennifer Mccammon, tells us,

“Vonnie Harris and her sister Viki created Jake ‘n Max’s Boxes of Love as a tribute to their beloved Labs, Jake and Max. The pair worked tirelessly to help “oldsters” by collecting gear and goods for senior pets each year. The project required finding partner businesses to serve as donation sites, decorating large boxes to contain donations (in later years the pair invited local seniors to participate in this), collecting and finally delivering donated goods to the beneficiaries — rescues serving senior pets.

 

We carry on Jake ‘n Max’s Boxes of Love out of gratitude for Vonnie and Viki’s care and service, and to honor Vonnie, who passed peacefully October 29.

 

For the love of senior pets . . . for the love of uplifting others . . . for the love of Vonnie.”

Please donate!

 

Pet Photos with Santa Raised $6,000 for The Pongo Fund

Pet Photos with Santa Raised $6,000 for The Pongo Fund

All three stores offered an opportunity to have memorable pet photos taken with Santa in December and the donations benefitted The Pongo Fund. We want to update folks on our donation!

Thank you all for coming out. Thanks to you, we’ve raised over $6,000 for The Pongo Fund. Here at Fang! Pet & Garden Supply we raised $2,662. Overall across all three stores, we snapped pics with 140 animals including a few cats and a chicken.

Thank you also to all our vendors that donated product for our wonderful goodie bags that we sent home with all those that participated.

“First off we would like to thank our friends at Ginger Beds for once again donating 3 of their beds to our raffle. Ginger Bed’s are locally made and we loving having them at our stores.”

The pics below! How adorable are these?

As a reminder, The Pongo Fund is Oregon’s only full-time charity focused on fighting animal hunger. They work tirelessly to reduce shelter populations and keep families together by providing emergency pet food assistance to anyone in honest need.

The donations went to help The Pongo Fund’s Mobile Animal Hospital that provides free lifesaving care for hundreds of animals each year thanks to a network of dedicated veterinarians and medical professionals. And of course, the donations will also help the community overall.

Go behind the scenes with us! This is from our Salty’s Pet Supply shoot.

Please leave a comment about the reaction you got when you posted your cute pic! Thank you for coming out!

Just getting our pictures w/Santa event kicked off! Please join us and Santa!

Posted by Salty's Pet Supply on Saturday, November 17, 2018

Enjoy these pics!

Santa Pics

Santa Pics

Santa Pics

Santa Pics

Santa Pics

Up-potting: How to Repot a Plant

Up-potting: How to Repot a Plant

Master gardeners will tell you that as your houseplant grows larger and the roots begin to grow through the drainage holes, repotting the plant into a larger pot will become necessary.

In addition, pests (gross!), diseases, and mold often infiltrate the soil of a potted plant. To prevent further damage or a recurrence of the problem, get rid of the old soil!

This post is another Q&A with one of ourexperts and nursery department head. if you have any questions, don’t hesitate to stop in and ask our staff about up-potting!

A Q&A with Granville Goff, Nursery Department Head,
Fang! Pet & Garden Supply

What is Up Potting?

Up potting is what we do when a plant has become root-bound in its current home. This means that the plant has cycled through several growth periods and has “outgrown” its current home.  

Indications: When you water, it runs immediately through (not enough soil for retention). Yellowing leaves that don’t respond to adjusted watering or fertilization,Visually if you can see the roots coiling (worth popping the plant out of the current pot to examine), If the plant looks too big for the size pot it is in(remember everything you see above the soil has relatively equal mass below the soil [roots]).

Materials

You will need a new pot, fresh potting soil (an appropriate blend for the type of plant), a watering can (with a narrow spout), materials for drainage if the pot has no drainage holes, a rubber mallet for jostling loose especially stuck plants. 

Important steps for repotting a plant

  1. In many cases, you can simply take the pot and tap it against a work surface in along the circumference and the root mass will “let go” of the pot walls.
  2. Other times you may need to cut a plant free from a plastic stock pot or tap the bottom and sides of a pot with a rubber mallet to loosen the plant.
  3. I would not recommend placing a coffee filter in the bottom of a pot since it is designed to absorb water and will begin to decompose increasing bacterial growth in the root zone which is a recipe for root rot and ultimately plant death.

Check out this YouTube video:

Here’s another example of how to repot a plant! 
Final product!
Mixed Chicken Flocks: Planning Ahead Goes A Long Way!

Mixed Chicken Flocks: Planning Ahead Goes A Long Way!

Combining pullets and chicks with full-grown chickens is a challenge. Because pecking order is a serious matter, it can be dangerous and risky no matter the circumstances. Having a mixed chicken flock keeps things lively though! There is no question that we were entertained throughout the process, and perhaps even some of the adult chickens were too.

Sadly, we did lose a chick to what we believe was wry neck. One day she just wasn’t herself and passed away quickly. Even if you want it to be, chicken keeping isn’t always rainbows and unicorns.

Existing dynamics are a consideration in mixed chicken flocks

Our chicken flock already has a well-established mama hen and two pullets, so that was another dynamic to be considered before adding eight new pullets into the mix. These pullets we’re incorporating were raised separately by my neighbor.

Before beginning, we made some coop adjustments (more hardware cloth please!) and a transition plan that we closely followed. From a few hiccups, most days are going smoothly overall.

Fresh Eggs Daily has an entire post and recommendation for a transition playpen or fenced off area in the coop (or next to it) when mixing chicken flocks, which was super helpful. We did that for a week before making an actual introduction.

Here’s my top ten list for your toolkit before you try a mixed chicken flock in your coop!

1. Space … and Perhaps Even a Little More Space: You do need a considerable amount of space and places for them to roost and rest (and escape other birds) throughout the day. We have tons of ladders, two sawhorses, and a smaller roosting ladder so they can chill without being bothered all the time for those lower in the pecking order.

2. Lots of Feeding Stations: Have More Than One – We Have Four!

3. Someone To Do Multiple Drive-by’s Throughout The Day: Outside of the bird we lost to wry neck, I also noticed one of the birds that happen to be tiny has a wound that scabbed over on her chest. She gets around fine, but I do check her out each day to make sure it’s healing. More eyes on the flock mean more folks to run interference if the chickens get pushy with each other.

4. Clean Water…A Must: All the chickens seem to be scratching near the water stations, so it feels like their water dishes get dirty quickly. Always make sure they have fresh water.

5. Mixed Flock = Lots More Chicken Manure. Clean up the poop under the roosting bars.

6. When to Transition From Starter to Grower? Feed based on the youngest member of the flock, and supplement as needed for the older birds (such as additional calcium sources for laying hens). A feed formulated for laying hens isn’t good for little chicks who don’t need that extra calcium yet. When I say we have a mixed flock, even our pullets are different ages within their little “gang.”  RULE: At eight weeks it’s ok to transition to Grower feed. Scratch and Peck has a great post about this, and that is what we’ve been feeding since day one.

Scratch and Peck has a feed guide for laying hens, as well as a wealth of other information for chicken keepers. Here’s the link: https://www.scratchandpeck.com/learning-center/helpful-guides/

Our youngest hen is now eight weeks old, so we are ready for Grower feed.

RULE: When feeding a mixed chicken flock, feed according to the youngest members of the flock and supplement as needed for the older birds. That’s the foundation of feeding mixed flocks.

7. Supplements Are Key: Grower Grit is Key During This Transition

8.  Transition Playpens Do Make a Difference: I mentioned this above briefly, but the concept of using a playpen to transition our pullets into the coop was brilliant. We kept them in this exact playpen for a week with food and water of course – all the big girls got to know them with the safety of netting between the pullets and the sharp beaks of the ladies!

9. Combat Boredom with Ways to Enrich Hens

To decrease any “Mean Girl” behavior in the coop (fall and winter often mean less time outside, after all) it’s nice to bring in some distractions. I recently gave two huge sliced up spaghetti squashes to the flock for them to peck at throughout the day.

10. Spread Some Love and Stick to a Routine

Chickens, like many animals, like a routine. It eases stress in their day to day life and helps them understand that their human caretakers are going to feed them and provide essentials every day. When we leave, we keep the chickens in the mobile coop for the day. They’re not able to free range, and I notice a lot of chatting coming from my fave RIR hen! The sounds and noises are very specific!

Chicken keepers need to consider a lot including the suggestions above. Having a plan makes this transition less stressful for the birds and humans. I wrote a post about chickens being complicated earlier this fall, and they are! When adding pullets to your existing flock, make sure you review this list and please comment below if you have any questions!

 

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